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Edward Thompson: Discussion & Analysis 2012 - Present

Discussion in 'Steam Traction' started by S.A.C. Martin, May 2, 2012.

  1. Spamcan81

    Spamcan81 Nat Pres stalwart

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    Depends on how selective or old that dictionary is.
    A quick search finds the following definitions :
    A person who offers an argument in defence of something controversial.
    A person who supports a particular belief or political system, especially an unpopular one, and speaks or writes in defence of it
    Someone who defends something such as a belief


    Language develops and meanings change over the years.
     
  2. S.A.C. Martin

    S.A.C. Martin Well-Known Member

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    Interesting view on front axle drive. In removing the front set of driving wheels on the P2, he changed the remaining driving wheels around to retain the centre driving wheel configuration to the outside cylinders and walschaerts valve gear.

    However, the centre cylinder DOES power the front set of wheels on a Thompson Pacific, hence the position of the bogie at the front end. This is Thompson's divided drive layout with three sets of walschaerts gear, with equal length connecting rods. This same layout is used on the Thompson A2/1 and A2/3 classes.

    Great Northern - A1/1 - uses a very similar layout, but, crucially, has a different length connecting rod for the centre cylinder.

    On the later Peppercorn A1 and A2, the centre cylinder is inclined higher and has a shorter connecting rod to the crank axle, but retains divided drive and three sets of walschaerts valve gear, hence the more compact wheelbase.

    I hesitate to be "revisionist" when saying this - but I think the conventional wisdom of Great Northern being the development for the Peppercorn A1 is wrong.

    The A1/1 utilised a lot of the Gresley A4 design (frames, boiler, cartazzi, cab and frame layout) and in almost all respects is a post-war Gresley A4, minus the streamlining, but retaining a similar outline to Thompson's earlier A2/1 and A2/1 cylinder layout (but not, as I stated earlier, identical due to the centre cylinder's connecting rod).

    The Peppercorn A1 shares more of its DNA with the P2 and A2/2 builds in terms of its frame, cartazzi, boiler and cylinder arrangements.

    I would therefore group the developments thusly:

    Group 1
    Gresley P2 > Thompson A2/2 & A2/3 > Peppercorn A1 & Peppercorn A2

    Group 2
    Gresley V2 > Thompson A2/1

    Group 3
    Gresley A10/A3 & Gresley A4 > Thompson A1/1

    All of the above groups have some interchangeability of parts with other classes within their own group, the A2/1 overlapping with Group 1 for cylinder layout, kylchap arrangement and similar.

    I've been called many things. Apologist, revisionist, maniac, hate preacher (yes this was aimed at me recently for my views on Thompson!), but never a researcher, interested party, railway enthusiast...!

    Well - when you put it that way - yes.
     
  3. S.A.C. Martin

    S.A.C. Martin Well-Known Member

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    It absolutely does, I agree.

    And in one other respect I agree - I fully accept that my offering an argument in defence of some of Edward Thompson's actions could be considered controversial - but I think the more one looks at the overall context of the war, the bits of information never given by some LNER historians (such as Cox's report), my views become less and less controversial and more reasonable.

    I accept, that's my personal viewpoint.
     

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